Online Graphing Calculator

Online Graphing Calculator / Graphing Calculator Online

Here’s a good example of what an Online Graphing Calculator can do:

 

Online Graphing Calculator

Blank Graphing Project

By Justin Jude Blanco

There is much debate about the best online graphing calculator.

A graphing calculator (online or handheld) is a calculator that is capable of plotting graphs, solving simultaneous equations, and performing other tasks with variables.

For answers, we went to Quora.com:


Desmos.com is the simplest and best. Use Plotter if you need a little more functionality.”

“If you want to plot raw data and not an equation, check out plot.ly .”

www.wolframalpha.com is pretty good.”

‘Check out www.meta-calculator.com ( a free online tool that we made and that can graph equations, solve matrices and much more)’


And, from Math.StackExchange:

“Some good options:”

 

“I really like Geogebra as a web based graphing tool (requires Java).”


And, finally, there’s bcalc.com. and graphfree.com


A Brief History of Handheld and Online Graphing Calculators

For a history of graphing calculators in general, we consulted (who else?) WikiPedia. Here’s what they say:

Casio

Casio produced the first commercially available graphing calculator, the fx-7000G, in 1985. Casio’s innovations include an icon menu for easy access to functions (1994, FX-7700GE and later), graphing in several colors (1995, CFX-9800G), expandable memory (FX-9860SD), textbook-like input and output (2009, FX-9750GII & 9860GII), backlit screen (2009, FX-9860 Slim & GII), full-color, high resolution backlit screen (2010, FX-CG10/CG20 PRIZM).

Sharp

Sharp produced its first graphing calculator, the EL-5200, in 1986. Since then Sharp’s innovations include models with a touchscreen (EL9600 series), Equation Editor (textbook-like input) (EL-9450 and later), and reversible keyboard to ease learning (one side has basic functions, the other side has additional functions) (EL-9900).

Hewlett Packard

Hewlett Packard followed in the form of the HP-28C. This was followed by the HP-28S (1988), HP-48SX (1990), HP-48S(1991), and many other models. Models like the HP 50g (2006) or the HP Prime (2013) feature a computer algebra system(CAS) capable of manipulating symbolic expressions and analytic solving. An unusual and powerful CAS “calculator” is the now obsolete year 2001 Casio Cassiopeia A-10 and A-11 (flip top) stylus-operated PDAs, which ran the Maple V symbolic engine. The HP-28 and -48 ranges were primarily meant for the professional science/engineering markets; the HP-38/39/40 were sold in the high school/college educational market; while the HP-49 series cater to both educational and professional customers of all levels. The HP series of graphing calculators is best known for its Reverse Polish notation (RPN) / Reverse Polish Lisp (RPL) interface, although the HP-49G introduced a standard expression entry interface as well.

Texas Instruments

Texas Instruments has produced graphing calculators since 1990, the oldest of which was the TI-81. Some of the newer calculators are similar, with the addition of more memory, faster processors, and USB connection such as the TI-82, TI-83 series, and TI-84 series. Other models, designed to be appropriate for students 10–14 years of age, are the TI-80 and TI-73. Other TI graphing calculators have been designed to be appropriate for calculus, namely the TI-85, TI-86, TI-89 series, and TI-92 series (TI-92, TI-92 Plus, and Voyage 200). TI offers a CAS on the TI-89, TI-Nspire CAS and TI-92 series of calculators. TI calculators are targeted specifically to the educational market, but are also widely available to the general public.


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